Jul 212015
 

define-learning-disabilityThe phrase “learning disabled” can mean different things.  To quote the Learning Disabilities Association of America’s website, “Learning disabilities are neurologically-based processing problems. These processing problems can interfere with learning basic skills such as reading, writing and/or math.  They can also interfere with higher level skills such as organization, time planning, abstract reasoning, long or short term memory and attention.  It is important to realize that learning disabilities can affect an individual’s life beyond academics and can impact relationships with family, friends and in the workplace.

“…Learning disabilities should not be confused with learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps; of mental retardation; of emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural or economic disadvantages.

“Generally speaking, people with learning disabilities are of average or above average intelligence. There often appears to be a gap between the individual’s potential and actual achievement. This is why learning disabilities are referred to as “hidden disabilities”: the person looks perfectly “normal” and seems to be a very bright and intelligent person, yet may be unable to demonstrate the skill level expected from someone of a similar age.

“A learning disability cannot be cured or fixed; it is a lifelong challenge.”

The site lists a number of specific learning disabilities, but I’m not sure which one applies to me because these terms are newer than when I was diagnosed and treated from 1983-85.

But here’s what I can tell you: I can’t remember any sequential information given to me verbally.  This includes a stream of numbers (like a phone number), which made math very difficult.  I also cannot remember a series of steps to take, which made just about everything almost impossible.  I’ve often joked that there’s a stereotype that guys never stop driving to ask for directions when they’re lost, and I wouldn’t either, not because I have a big ego about my ability to get from one place to another, but because I wouldn’t remember anything you told me anyway.

I’ll soon post about how I overcame this.  And do every day.

What “Learning Disabled” Means For Me

The phrase “learning disabled” can mean different things.  To quote the Learning Disabilities Association of America’s website, “Learning disabilities are neurologically-based processing problems. These processing problems can interfere with learning basic skills such as reading, writing and/or math.  They can also interfere with higher level skills such as organization, time planning, abstract reasoning, long or […]

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What I’ve Accomplished Despite Being Learning Disabled

One problem with the term “learning disabled” is that it can give the impression that you not only can’t learn but that you’ll never accomplish much.  Both LD people and those unaware of what being LD means can assume this. To combat that, and to give hope to any LD people suffering the same low self-esteem […]

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Why I Blog About Attention Deficit Disorder

Like everyone who has it, I was born with ADD, and it’s permanent.  Technically, the name has changed to ADHD, but that’s misleading for me because I don’t have the “H” – hyperactivity. I’ll be blogging about this because it’s part of my overall story in ways more profound than you’d expect.  I hope to shed […]

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Why I Write About Being Learning Disabled

I’m learning disabled and have been all my life, as it isn’t curable.  It’s just something you deal with and hopefully learn to overcome – every day.  I’ve decided to start sharing my story to give hope to those dealing with it, either because they’re learning disabled or someone they know, like their child, is.  I’ve […]

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