May 162016
 

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones.

1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision

This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because it avoids exposing you to the risk of making decisions by yourself.  You might make a final decision, but if it’s with the help of trained, highly paid staff, then your chances of success are that much greater.  Your staff will respect you.

2. If a staff member is making mistakes, you ask if everything is okay or if they understand requirements

This really shows you look out for people and care about them and their careers.  Someone might be having personal trouble, or be under stress.  Maybe there’s something you don’t know about that’s affecting their job performance.  Or maybe they’ve made some honest mistakes.  Treating people like a real person goes a long way to acting like a decent human yourself.  You’re the kind of manager everyone loves.

3. You’re flexible about time off

Everyone likes a manager who lets them make up time for appointments or work extra hours for the same reason.  As long as your staff are getting their work done, being cool this way earns loyalty, but making sure they’re working covers your butt.  Being civil and helpful says you’re a cool manager

4. You give kudos to those who do a good job

When staff work overtime or just do a great job, a good manager thanks them and shows appreciation.  Most people want the approval of their manager, so give it to them when they deserve it!

5. You recognize that small issues are just that, minor

Not blowing things out of proportion is one sign of a good manager. As a case in point, I once left my laptop on my desk overnight against company policy, but it mostly wasn’t my fault, as I was forced offsite with little notice and thought I’d be back later, but ended up going home from the other location.  I was actually fired for this and a few other minor things blown out of proportion.  This sort of thing says terrible things about management and a company.

6. You try to find staff work they’ll enjoy

It’s a given that sometimes people have to do tasks they don’t want to.  Recognizing this out loud (“Hey this kind of stinks, but…”) shows that you’re aware of their skills and what they want to be doing and recognize this isn’t it.  If you can toss them a good project later to compensate, then “taking one for the team” is a little easier to take – and smarter for you to manage their upset about a lame task.

7. You try to find staff work that fits their skills

It’s an unfortunate reality that IT managers have tasks that need to get done that don’t fit with anyone’s skill sets.  Even so, it’s better to tell people they have some options, like one project or another.  If there’s only one, tell them you’d understand if they don’t want to do it but that it’s all you have.  Just forcing it on someone and acting like you’re unaware it sucks for them will make you look indifferent and callous.  Don’t act surprised when they quit, either.

8. Reward initiative

If someone steps up or otherwise volunteers, show appreciation for this.  If they offer to help, recognize their desire to be useful.  Your staff are your greatest – and likely only – resource besides yourself, and smart managers learn to make their people want to work for them.

9. If a new policy – or an old one – is suddenly enforced, your understanding of an adjustment being needed is good

No one likes change, so if it comes, being fair to staff earns respect and cooperation.  People must adjust.  Giving advance warning and feedback on whether people are doing the right thing is not only right, but just and fair.

10. Give fair performance reviews

This sort of goes back to recognition, but if the company allows, sit down with each staff member before a formal review and ask them for reminders of all the good things they’ve done in a year.  It will help you not forget and be fairer.

Another 10 Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go! 1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks. This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially […]

1 comment

Ten Signs You’re a Good IT Manager

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones. 1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad IT Manager

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation. 1. You throw me under the bus Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Recently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end. 1. After receiving […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order: 1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one: A job description A fairly specific location […]

0 comments
May 092016
 

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation.

1. You throw me under the bus

Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them over.  It’s always better to be fair to someone, talk to them with the benefit of the doubt, and give them a chance to improve.  Badmouthing to them to upper management and summarily firing them is a sign you’re a bad manager.  It makes both you and the company look bad, and the poor employee who has to explain to friends, family, the unemployment office, and possibly to FBI agents for the next 7-10 years when applying for a security clearance.

2. You try to take credit for my work

If your staff is doing such good work that you feel the need to steal credit, then you’re just alienating one of your best people. You can still get credit for getting such good work out of someone without being unethical.

3. You make something trivial into a big deal

Having perspective in life goes a long way.  Don’t pick fights with staff or make them feel bad about some petty thing that’s happened. It won’t gain you anything but disrespect.

4. You don’t get staff input on matters (when you should) before making important decisions

Managers are often not as technical as their staff, and when this is the case, it’s a mistake for a manager to make a decision about how things will go without getting input from those who know.  You’re supposed to be part of a team. Being the boss doesn’t mean bossing people around; it means bringing people together and getting the best performance out of them.

Once that bad decision has been made, and your staff tells you it’s impossible, blaming the situation on them only compounds the problem you’ve created.  I’ve seen this repeatedly and it never ends well, splintering teams apart and earning major disrespect.

5. You tell staff it’s their job to find themselves work to do when that’s actually your job

This shouldn’t need explaining, but companies have proposal writers and other staff (including senior executives) whose job it is to win federal contracts (we’re talking D.C. here) and it’s literally not my job to do this. IT managers assign work to staff. We don’t assign work to ourselves. Or invent projects no one needs.

6. You try to make people do inappropriate work

Those in IT have a specialized skill-set (i.e., software development in certain languages), so trying to make them exclusively do documentation (for years), for example, is not acceptable. Nor is turning someone into your assistant. Or throwing every junk project to the same person.  They’re just going to quit.

7. You become resentful about work/life balance requests

This includes not letting people work from home when they need to, or make up time for an appointment.  Or giving them grief about an emergency.  Or trying to refuse to let them go to a doctor appointment unless they want to get in trouble with you.  Since they’re not a child, don’t try to treat them like one.  It will only earn disrespect – and then they’ll be gone.

8. You change the details of the job for the worse just because you can

I once had a manager tell me on my first day as an employee (after six months as a contractor), that I now had to work 9 hour days instead of 8. We didn’t have a deadline to beat or anything like that. He just did it “because you’re my bitch now” as he put it, with a laugh. Our relationship deteriorated from there.  Don’t try to pull power trips on your staff unless you want their disrespect and resignation.  You may not be an adult, be we are. It won’t go unnoticed.  You are being watched whether you think so or not.

9. The first sign people get that there’s a problem with them is “you’re fired.”

People deserve to be given chances to follow directions or fix mistakes, which could be innocent or have a reasonable explanation.  Not doing so reveals a desire to just fire someone without cause, which is the ultimate in being a bad manager.  This will make the company look bad when people leave bad reviews on sites like Glassdoor.com.

10. You suddenly decide a policy is without flexibility and must be enforced in draconian ways

People get used to doing things a certain way at jobs, even if it’s not according to rules, but that’s how it’s been done forever.  Suddenly cracking down might be okay, but not if you do things like fire people, for example, for doing things the old way for months.  Sudden enforcement must come with warnings or you’ll seem like an ogre.

Another 10 Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go! 1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks. This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially […]

1 comment

Ten Signs You’re a Good IT Manager

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones. 1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad IT Manager

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation. 1. You throw me under the bus Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Recently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end. 1. After receiving […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order: 1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one: A job description A fairly specific location […]

0 comments
Jul 202015
 

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go!

1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks.

This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially in writing.

I’ve had a couple guys yell at me (writing in all caps).  Someone once tried to tell me what kind of person he thought I was (it wasn’t flattering), just because he felt I owed him a call back.  Another guy shouted that I was wasting everyone’s time when I turned down the interview because I’d accepted another job in the meantime and called to tell him so.

Just don’t do it.

2. You don’t have a job for me.  You want to chat about my career goals when my profile and resume say what those are. You claim it will “only take 5 minutes!” and badger me into it, then won’t let me off the phone for 20 minutes of talking that is almost all you.

recruiter-illustrationRecruiters do this with the explanation that we’re forming a relationship that will bear fruit down the line.  It’s not true.  Not once have I gotten a job from this, in over 15 years, which is why I won’t do this, to the amazement of some recruiters.  It’s a recruiters job to talk and form relationships. It’s my job to code and avoid ceaseless, pointless blathering.  Yes, I know how it sounds, but it’s the truth.  The more I’m talking (or listening to someone else do it), the less productive I am.  It’s one reason coders hate meetings.

Besides, you’ll call me later, when you have a job for me, without this conversation having taken place, so there’s literally no reason for me to entertain this.  That you’ll talk my ear off is the real deal breaker here.  And the fact that plenty of other recruiters are contacting me about actual jobs at the same time that you’re doing this.  It really is a waste of my time.

Imagine if the 20-30 other recruiters did it. I’d literally be on the phone all day.

3. You insist on doing #2 in person.

Some firms want to tell their clients, “We interview everyone in person before even sending their resume so we know we’re sending good people.” This “selling point” for your firm (to your clients, not me) is more work for me and gains me nothing.  You’ll try to tell me that it gives me an edge over candidates that other firms are sending, but it probably doesn’t.

It is actually a big negative for me due to the hassle. Depending on time of day and distance, this can cost me an additional hour or two when you don’t even have a job for me.

I refuse to work with these companies anymore because there are so many jobs I can get without having to deal with this.

4. You tell me that writing a job description for me is a waste of your time when that’s actually part of your job.

I’ve actually heard this several times. It is hard to believe. Over 99% of your peers already provide one without me having to ask. It’s industry standard. In fact, when you don’t send one in your initial email, I’m very unlikely to reply at all. And never tell me my request is a “waste of your time.”  That’s just stupid and falls under #1 above.

5. You don’t tell me there’s a written or computer exam and I only find out at the interview when handed one.

This is something you always need to find out and tell people. These tech screenings are often unfair even with advance warning, but setting me up to fail/be broadsided tells me you aren’t looking out for me. Make sure you get it right, too (whether it’s verbal, written, etc., light questions versus very technical). I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been told what to expect and it’s totally off. More often than not, probably.

6. You ask me questions that make it clear you haven’t read my resume.

Doing your homework will make you look good. Not doing it will not.

7. After I tell you that the job doesn’t meet my criteria, you say “Let me tell you about this anyway” and proceed to do so, ignoring my attempts to stop you.

This is just rude. I don’t get it. Do you just want to hear yourself talk? Are you lonely?

8. I tell you my hourly rate for contract work and you try to talk me down by a whopping $20-25 per hour, as if $40k less a year is no biggie.

Are you that ignorant of the pay cut you’re trying to convince me to take or do you think I’m desperate? I can get a job for what I quoted you. If for some bizarre reason I accepted your job, I’d keep looking and quit the second I got a less ridiculous rate, so what’s the point for you?

9. Your English is incomprehensible.

I have no issue with foreigners or thick accents, but if you’re that hard to understand, email will be better for you.

10. You act like you’re doing me a favor by contacting me when there are another 20 recruiters contacting me the same day, sometimes about the same job.

Maybe this accounts for some of what’s on this list.  It’s a competitive world out there and this doesn’t give you an advantage.  I suppose this could fall under #1, so here’s a bonus:

11. Bonus #1 – You already know the job is off target but send it anyway and ask me to forward it to people I might know, doing your job for you.

Some people consider this networking.  I don’t.  It’s a touchy area and since you don’t know how someone feels about this, you should be super nice when trying this.  Bear in mind that lots of people might be doing that to me and with repetition comes my dislike.  You might not think it’s a big deal, but if every recruiter did that I’d get thousands of emails a day.

It’s okay to ask when the job also applies to me. It’s another thing to send jobs that have nothing to do with me. Don’t do it.

12. Bonus # – You threaten to blacklist me because you’ve taken something personally, like this list.

Remember that in the digital world, something like a threat lasts forever. It’s beyond just unprofessional.

Another 10 Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go! 1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks. This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially […]

1 comment

Ten Signs You’re a Good IT Manager

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones. 1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad IT Manager

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation. 1. You throw me under the bus Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Recently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end. 1. After receiving […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order: 1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one: A job description A fairly specific location […]

0 comments
Jul 132015
 

recruiter-editRecently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end.

1. After receiving your email/call, I respond with my resume and the information you requested, but you ignore me, even when I follow up.

Ignoring people is seldom good, but it depends.  Whoever initiates contact risks getting no reply from the other person if the recipient is not interested. It’s just the way it works.  But when the contacted person replies, a dialogue has been opened. It must now be completed without ignoring. Otherwise, the next time you contact them, they may not reply because you’ll just leave them hanging again.

2. We go back and forth with emails and calls and then one day you just ignore me and I never hear from you again despite repeatedly following up with you.

See #1, but if the job has fallen through or something else has happened (or even if you don’t know what’s going on), you should communicate something to me about this.

3. You send me a first email that says no more than “I have a job for you. Contact me if interested.”

That’s not going to cause interest.  I can tell you’re not trying and you’re probably not going to respond to me anyway.  Your peers are doing way better than this.  You must try harder than that.

4. You send me emails calling me “candidate” instead of my name.  Repeatedly.

You should always use my name. This impersonal approach sounds too much like headhunting, which is one the recruiting elements you should downplay.

5. You send one email to me and 20+ other candidates, and I can see their names and addresses (and they can see mine) in the address field. Repeatedly.

See #4.  Spamming is bad.  I do expect you to take the time to contact me personally, even if you’re pasting the same email you just sent someone else. Don’t make me think I’m just a body in a seat to you. And don’t give out my name and email address to a bunch of strangers please.

6. You send me jobs that are for skill sets/technologies that aren’t on my resume (not even close). Repeatedly.

I’m not expecting this and it’s not okay. This tells me you aren’t good at your job and I probably shouldn’t work with you when you do send me an appropriate job. It should be obvious that I’m not going to answer you.  You’re spamming me.

7. You don’t know what the technologies listed on my resume are and how they relate to each other.  Example: not knowing that .NET, ASP .NET, C#, and Visual Studio are all basically the same thing.

Knowing these things isn’t complicated and takes a few minutes to learn, so it really is required knowledge. Not knowing means you’re unqualified to be a technical recruiter for positions I’m seeking.  You must do your homework.  I might answer you if the job sounds good, but I don’t respect you.

8. You send me jobs that are between 100 and 3000 miles from my house when my online profile/resume clearly says I do not relocate.

I can’t fault you for taking a chance that I’ll change my mind, but with lots of recruiters doing this, I just don’t reply anymore. It comes off as desperate and spammy. If my resume had only a couple years experience, suggesting I’m young, single, and mobile, that’s one thing, but when I’ve got 15 or more years of experience, all in the same region, that means I’m probably in my 40s, married (wife has a job, too, and would need another), have kids, a house, and my whole life is here, the odds are just not good for you, especially if you’re talking about a 3-6 month contract. I’m not going to answer you.

The exception is Hawaii.  Always send me those jobs!

9. You send me contracting jobs when I only want FTE, or vice versa, and my profile/resume says so.

This isn’t that bad and can be an innocent mistake, and you can be feeling me out to see if it’s still true.  On the other hand, I’ve owned a consulting company for years (this is listed on the resume) and am only doing Corp-to-Corp (resume also says this), which means I’m all set up with 401k, insurances, health care, an accountant, website, and more.  I realize you likely don’t quite understand this is important.

It’s good to acknowledge that you’re aware of my requirement but that you’re taking a chance; otherwise it seems like you aren’t paying attention and haven’t read my resume.

10. You won’t discuss even basic details, like location, technology, FTE vs. contracting, unless it’s over the phone, even after I tell you this is difficult for me (can’t talk at work, while driving, or I’m watching a loud toddler once home, etc.). And you’re so set on this that you blow me off.

Respecting the preferences of candidates is a good thing. Your peers will do it and I’ll end up talking to them instead of you.  Insisting that I meet your preferences comes across as self-important and disrespectful, and why would I want to get on the phone with you when you can’t tell me such basics without me asking – or even after I do ask?  You’re hard to work with and I won’t do it.

Another 10 Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go! 1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks. This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially […]

1 comment

Ten Signs You’re a Good IT Manager

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones. 1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad IT Manager

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation. 1. You throw me under the bus Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Recently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end. 1. After receiving […]

0 comments

Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order: 1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one: A job description A fairly specific location […]

0 comments
Jun 142015
 

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order:

1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one:
  1. A job description
  2. A fairly specific location (i.e., at least the city)
  3. Whether it’s contracting (and how long if so) or FTE

Without the first, I don’t know if the job is appealing, and the more detailed you are, the better.  Similarly, knowing location is an absolute must because I’m not accepting jobs halfway across the country or with a two-hour commute.  I’ve also worked as a consultant, employee, and on contract-to-hire, but sometimes I’m only interested in one of these; being up front about this tells me whether we need to talk.

2. You answer all of the questions I send to you.

In response to your email, I’ve asked questions because the answers matter, so responding to all of them tells me you respect me and take me seriously. And you aren’t making me asking something twice.  Yes, I will notice if you didn’t tell me something I asked.

Female Office Worker3. You tell me whether there’s a tech interview and what type (oral, written, computer) up front, and you’re right.

No one likes surprises and, to be honest, the written and computer exams lean toward being unfair. And uncommon.  I actually don’t do them anymore unless the job sounds like a dream, so this is part of the interview experience I expect to know about up front. Being forthcoming shows me you understand these are stressful and you’d like me to do well by preparing me.

4. The job is on target regarding technologies I do.

This tells me you’ve read my resume and thought about whether contacting me makes sense, and that you’re not wasting my time with inappropriate jobs. Or fishing.

5. The job is on target regarding location (albeit there’s some leeway you can’t know about).

This tells me you’ve noticed where I live, where I’ve worked before, and the preferences I’ve listed. Not understanding my area’s traffic (because you live far away) is not a deal breaker, but you’ve made it possible for me to understand the commute.

6. The job is on target regarding contracting, consulting. or FTE

This again tells me you’re paying attention, and telling me up front means I don’t have to ask.

recruiter-button-300x3007. If we get on the phone, you keep it short

Recognizing that I’m very busy – and fielding calls and emails from 20-30 recruiters a day – tells me you’re respectful of my time and efficient and professional about yours. You’ll be great to work with.

8. You always respond and/or call back, even when knowing it won’t work out.

Sadly, not replying is part of the modern world, but once we’ve established a dialogue, we both need to continue it until your client says they aren’t interested, or I say that.  Kudos for telling me the verdict instead of just ignoring me – that means I’m unlikely to talk to you again.

9. You give me your direct phone number (instead of the main recruiting company one).

This is minor, but I appreciate getting you directly instead of always going through the receptionist or a directory. Or worst of all, always having to leave a message and hope you’ll call back when I can take the call.

10. If you must see me before sending me on an interview, you are fine with Skype.

Some recruiting firms have a policy that they must meet me before sending me on an interview. Depending on traffic, this can take 60-90 minutes (instead of under 20), and considering that I may not even get an interview, if you’re willing to do this via Skype, big points for you.

Bonus #1. Your first voice mail says everything in #1 and is clear, short, and has your name and number at the start.

One of my pet peeves is when I have to wait until the end of a long voice mail for someone’s name and number, which they then say so fast that I have to listen to the whole thing over again to get all of it. Starting with your name and number is golden. Thank you!

Bonus #2. You’re okay with doing things (email vs. phone) in a way that works best for me.

Being okay with my preferred way to communicate shows flexibility and respect.

Another 10 Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Last week we looked at ten signs you’re a “bad” IT recruiter, but there are another ten to go through, so here we go! 1. You give me an attitude about anything or make any negative, personal remarks. This is never okay, even if you feel it’s deserved.  You’re at work and can’t do this, especially […]

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Ten Signs You’re a Good IT Manager

Since we’ve looked at reasons someone can be a bad IT manager, let’s look at reasons for good ones. 1. You ask staff opinions about technical concerns before trying to make a decision This is relevant if you’re less technical/current than your staff.  It shows you respect them and are a team player. It’s also smart because […]

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Ten Signs You’re a Bad IT Manager

Life in the corporate world is hugely affected by managers, so we’ll take a look at ten reasons managers can be terrible.  If you’re a manager, watch out for doing these things and earning a bad reputation. 1. You throw me under the bus Managers are supposed to look out for their staff, not screw them […]

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Ten Signs You’re a Bad Technical Recruiter

Recently I did the Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter.  This time we look at ten mistakes technical recruiters can make so that programmers don’t respond favorably (or at all) to job postings and calls/emails.  And what recruiters can do to mitigate these issues. If you have comments, please add them at the end. 1. After receiving […]

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Ten Signs You’re a Good Technical Recruiter

As a professional programmer, I’ve interacted with technical recruiters for over fifteen years and have noticed that the good ones share certain traits.  Here are things I like in a recruiter, in no particular order: 1. You send me an email with the following info in the very first one: A job description A fairly specific location […]

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